How Damaging Is Mould Illness For Your Health

by Laurel Scott

Places that are not well ventilated, and have damp and humid conditions are ideal for mould to thrive. Such conditions have been quite common and sometimes even worse this summer in Australia because of La Niña, which is a weather phenomenon that results in excessive rain. Many cities on the eastern coast have recorded one of their wettest summers for over 10 years.

 

Many experts’ stresses on the significance of not giving mould a chance to grow and become widespread in your home.

 

Mould is lethal and can bring about ailment, experts say. “It will fuel existing sicknesses, for example, allergies or asthma and reduces the recovery speed of wounds. It harms the physical structure of your home or property and infects/taints anything it contacts.

 

There’s no doubt that mould is present everywhere in some amount and we breathe in its spores continuously, but it can start to play havoc on our health when the concentration builds.

 

The impacts of moulds and excess moisture on the respiratory wellbeing of kids are similar to the impact of passive smoking and incorporate different negative impacts also, for example, chronic bronchitis and asthma. High exposure to mould is connected with catching more colds, headaches, fever, diseases of the respiratory system, and irritation in the eyes and skin. It might even result in death, but only in severe cases in which treatment is provided on time.

 

  • Are You Suffering From Any Allergy?

 

It has been estimated that more than 40% people have some sort of sensitivity to breathing in mould spores, which are microscopic ‘seeds’ produced by mould colonies and spread into air in millions every day. However, recent researches have shown that mould affects the health on a much larger scale than just starting runny noses, respiratory irritation, asthma attacks and allergic reactions.

 

Mould illness is quite common in almost every part of the world. A recent study conducted in Australia also established a connection between mouldy, damp homes and depression. On the other hand, a research in the UK found that newborn babies and kids living in mould infested homes have a higher chance of developing respiratory illnesses, for example, pneumonia and bronchitis.

 

  • Take a look at some tips for eliminating and preventing mould.

 

  • Removing Mould from hard surfaces, fabrics and upholstery – Take a half teaspoon of clove oil (you can get from pharmacies and markets) blended with one litre of water, and then spray this mixture on the mould.
  • Removing Mould from Leather – Take half teaspoon of clove oil blended with 250ml baby oil. Drop 2 drops on the leather surface where mould has grown and wipe it with a cloth.
  • Removing Mould from Cupboards – Hang 5 to 10 chalk sticks tied with a thread in the cupboard, and then let it absorb dampness. You can replace them with new pieces when they become damp, and don’t forget to throw the damp pieces.
  • Removing Mould from Books – Put some chalks right behind the area where books are kept. The chalks will absorb the dampness eventually.
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